Marketing CV: Examples & How to Write

Marketing CV: Examples & How to Write

Create a viral campaign for your job hunt with a marketing CV packed full of features and benefits to convince hiring managers you’re a must-have product.

You spend your career immersed in promoting products and services to your customers. But even the most experienced marketing professionals struggle when it comes to writing a marketing CV.

 

But in truth, the key to job hunting success is so simple that you probably overlooked it. Writing a good marketing CV is all about what you do best, promoting a product. Except the service is you. And just like the products and services you promote at work, you can maximise the impact on your target audience with a clever marketing strategy.

 

Read on and you’ll see marketing CV examples that’ll help you to perfect your own. You’ll also get a foolproof guide to writing a CV for marketing jobs that’ll get you more interviews than any CV you’ve written before.

 

Let’s start our campaign with a marketing CV example made with our builder. 

 

Want to save time and have your CV ready in 5 minutes? Try our CV builder. It’s fast and easy to use. Plus, you’ll get ready-made content to add with one click. See 20+ CV templates and create your CV here.

 

marketing cv templates

Marketing CV made with our builder—See more templates and create your CV here.

 

And if marketing isn’t your thing we’ve got plenty of other CV writing guides too.

 

Sample Marketing CV Template

 

Martin Bashir

Ph: 0777 777 7777

Email: mbashir_zety@gmail.com

 

Creative marketing assistant and recent 1st class honours graduate in BSc Management (Marketing). A strong advocate of empowering businesses to step up their digital marketing game and maximise efficiency of social media campaigns. Looking to further develop my skills in digital marketing with the innovative team at ManchMarketing.

 

Work Experience

 

Marketing Assistant

Woodward & Rogers, Manchester

July 2019–Present

  • Provided support to Head of Marketing and team of 5 experienced marketing professionals.
  • Created and designed graphics for 30+ banner adverts for Facebook.
  • Improved efficiency of customer database, eliminating 500+ incorrect datapoints.
  • Assisted in creating new email outreach campaign which increased open rate to 15% and generated 100+ links for client content.
  • Acted as first point of contact for incoming calls, receiving positive feedback for customer service.

 

Education

 

BSc Management (Marketing), First Class Honours. September 2016–June 2019

University of Manchester

 

Skills

 

  • Digital marketing: Worked with Google & Facebook SEM and advert design.
  • Negotiation skills: Negotiated reduced rates for print advertising campaigns.
  • Analytical skills: Analysed keyword performance data to optimise page ranking for client content.
  • Email marketing: Created effective email outreach campaigns.
  • Content management systems: Utilised Wordpress for publishing and content management.

 

Languages

 

  • Arabic—Fluent

 

Now the foolproof guide to writing your own marketing CV.

 

1. Choose the Best Format for Your Marketing CV

 

Marketing is the act of promoting or selling products and services. So the purpose of your marketing CV is to show you understand your customers and are able to build relationships with them by anticipating their needs and delivering offerings that have value to them.

 

It’s a process that takes a great deal of time and effort. But a busy recruiter with a towering stack of CVs takes as little as six seconds to review your job application.

 

Here’s how to make the most of that eyeball time.

  • Use the most effective CV format. There’s only one choice for writing the best marketing CV and that’s chronological. It’s familiar to recruiters and it’s effective because its focal point is your work experience.
  • Create a crisp CV layout with one-inch margins on all sides of the page, double-spacing between CV sections and using left alignment only. Doing this creates lots of white space, and it’s that empty space on the page that makes your content easy to read.
  • Choose a good font for your CV. Bear in mind that your CV is most likely to be read on a screen, and research suggests sans serif fonts are best for screen text. So Calibri, Tahoma and Arial would all be excellent choices.
  • Save your marketing CV in PDF format to keep your layout neat and tidy. And don’t overdo it. The ideal CV length is 1–2 pages.
  • Lastly, there are a few things you should never include in a CV. Personal information like your date of birth, marital status and photo have no place on a professional CV.

Read more: How to Create a Professional CV Layout

2. Start with a Marketing CV Personal Profile

 

Your personal profile is the first section of your CV and it’s also known as your personal statement or CV summary. It’s simply a 3–4 line paragraph that serves as the introduction to your CV. You need to give a brief overview of why you’re a great candidate and show the hiring manager that your CV is worth reading. Here’s how to do it.

 

Make a start by considering these three questions.

 

  1. Who are you?
  2. What can you offer to the employer?
  3. What are your career goals?

 

Then the way you answer them changes depending on how experienced you are. So let’s say you’re a highly experienced professional writing a marketing manager CV. In that case, follow this approach.

  • Remember, you’re the product to promote. So list your selling points. For recruitment purposes, this is your experience, skills, and professional achievements.
  • Then you need to find out more about your customer’s needs. That’s the hiring manager, and the job advert tells you everything they want in their perfect product. Read it and list all of the skills and experience it mentions.
  • Then check which of your selling points match up with what’s in the advert and use 3–4 of those that match to write a CV summary that’s perfectly tailored to your customer.

 

If you’re just starting out and writing a marketing assistant CV, then use this method instead.

  • Focus on your transferable skills and experience. List all of the knowledge and experience that you’ve obtained from your education and prior work history that’s transferable to a marketing position.
  • And again, research your customer. Check over the job advert just as you would if you were more experienced.
  • Finally, choose 3–4 points of your transferable skills that match up with the job requirements and combine them with energy and enthusiasm for the job to show you’ll be an eager and engaged new employee.

 

Although this is the first section of your CV, you should always leave writing it until last. It’s much easier to sum everything up when the rest of your CV is already written.

Read more: How to Write Your CV Summary [10+ Professional Examples]

3. Secure the Sale with Your Marketing Work Experience Section

 

Your work experience section is where you need to go viral and make yourself the undisputed bestseller. It’s the single most important section of your CV for promoting yourself as a candidate so it has to be written perfectly. Here’s how to do it.

  • List your work history in reverse chronological order, starting with your most recent role.
  • Then include the same basic information for each role, your job title, the name of the employer and the dates you worked there.
  • For each job write up to six bullet points that describe what you did. Liven them up by starting them with CV action verbs like coordinated, strengthened and promoted. 
  • Then turn them into a well-executed marketing pitch by adding in numbered achievements and a solid structure that makes use of accomplishment statements.
  • And make sure your work experience section is carefully targetted to the role you’re applying for. Make sure you’ve addressed as many of the job requirements as possible.

Read more: What to Include in Your CV Work Experience Section

4. Include an Education Section

 

Your education section is more important when you’re early in your career. But that doesn’t mean that more experienced candidates can neglect it. All CVs need to contain an education section. Here’s how to write it.

  • For school-leavers, list your A-levels, naming each subject you studied. GCSEs can also be included if you’ve just left school, just state the number of subjects you did and always name Maths and English specifically as they’re a minimum requirement for many entry-level roles. 
  • And for both GCSEs and A-levels, write the name of the school and the dates you attended.
  • If you’re a university graduate, write the name of your uni, your degree and the dates you attended. Use your expected graduation date as the end date if you’re still studying. 
  • And this section can be put before your work experience section if you’re still studying or just graduated within the last year. Adding relevant individual modules is also a good idea for new grads.

Read more: How to Write Your CV Education Section

 

5. Point out Your Main Benefits—Your Marketing Skills

 

The popular image of marketing is a group of people sitting together in a meeting pitching outlandish ideas for product promos. But there’s so much more to marketing than playing ‘sell me this pen’. It combines communication with project management and analytical skills, just to name a few. So how do you choose a select few skills to fit into a one or two page CV? Here’s how to narrow it down.

  • Go back to the job advert, and this time, list every skill that’s mentioned. Then make a second list of all of your own marketing skills.
  • Choose 5–10 of your marketing skills for your CV that match up with the job requirement and add them to your skills section. Make sure it’s a mix of hard skills and soft skills.
  • And back up each skill with a short statement that proves how you demonstrate it. E.g. Negotiation skills: Consistently negotiated reduced rates for print advertising campaigns.

 

These skills would all look great on your marketing CV.

 

Essential Marketing CV Skills

 

  • Networking
  • Project Management
  • Leadership
  • Analytical skills
  • Email marketing
  • Social media marketing
  • Communication skills
  • Content management systems
  • Creative thinking
  • Negotiation skills
  • SEO/SEM
  • Marketing automation

 

I mentioned the ‘sell me this pen’ exercise. You probably know the right way to answer isn’t just to launch into a sales pitch but to find out more about your customer first. You have to find out what benefits they need from a pen to sell to them effectively. It’s the same with the best marketing CV examples. Always research the company and carefully analyse the job advert before you start writing so you can create a perfectly targetted marketing campaign for yourself.

Read More: Best List of Examples for Your CV Skills Section

When making a CV in our builder, drag & drop bullet points, skills, and auto-fill the boring stuff. Spell check? Check. Start building your CV here.

When you’re done, Zety’s resume builder will score your resume and tell you exactly how to make it better.

6. Add Extra Sections to Your Marketing CV

 

If you were to stop with your skills section, you’d have a complete CV. But as a marketing professional, you’ll know you can’t stand out as a product in a crowded field by doing the bare minimum. So here are some ideas on how to cover every possible angle when it comes to marketing yourself.

  • If you speak a foreign language then include a languages section. It’s been said that there’s a ‘languages crisis’ in the UK so having languages skills will definitely help you stand out as an elite candidate.
  • Some other ideas could be volunteering experience, awards or hobbies and interests. If it’s relevant and markets you effectively as a good candidate then it’s a worthy addition to your CV.

Read more: Best Hobbies and Interests to Include on Your CV

7. Write a Marketing Cover Letter

 

By now, you’ll have a perfectly written marketing CV. But we’re not done yet. There’s one more thing we can do to give your latest job search campaign a viral boost. Write a cover letter. It’s the best way to take your CV to the next level.

 

Here’s how to write a good cover letter for marketing jobs.

  • Master the basics with a good cover letter format and by writing your cover letter address correctly.
  • Write a compelling cover letter opening by including a ‘hook’ in your first paragraph. Impress the hiring manager with a standout professional achievement.
  • Keep up the pace in the middle of your cover letter by weaving in more proof of your expertise in the form of relevant experience and accomplishments. Also show passion and energy for the employer and the role you’re applying for.
  • Then in your cover letter ending ask the hiring manager to get in touch with you so you can discuss the role further. This is known as a call to action and it’s a great way of increasing your chances of getting an interview.
  • And know when to stop writing. The maximum length of a cover letter is one page.

 

Plus, a great cover letter that matches your CV will give you an advantage over other candidates. You can write it in our cover letter builder here. Here's what it may look like:

 

matching set of cv and cover letter

See more cover letter templates and start writing.

Thanks for reading and please let me know if you found our digital marketing CV examples useful. There are lots of different roles in the marketing sector and you may need specific advice. So if you’re writing a marketing executive CV, marketing coordinator CV, or any other variation, then please let me know if you need any advice. Just ask me in the comments section and I’ll be delighted to be of assistance.

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Jacques Buffett
Jacques is a career expert committed to delivering top-notch job hunting advice. His guides will empower you to craft winning resumes and cover letters.

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