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How to Show a Promotion on a Resume (or Multiple Positions)

How to Show a Promotion on a Resume (or Multiple Positions)

Staying for a long time with the same company has its benefits. And shortcomings too.

 

One of the latter becomes obvious when you decide to change jobs and—

 

You’ve got no idea how to show multiple positions and promotions on your resume.

 

In this article, you’ll learn how to put multiple positions and promotions on a resume in several different scenarios—when your duties remained the same, when they changed, and when you returned to work for your previous employer after a stint elsewhere.

 

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sample resume templates

Sample resume made with our builder—See more templates and create your resume here.

 

1

Similar Positions in the Same Company

 

Here’s the thing—

 

You may get a promotion from a specialist to an expert position. The scope of your duties doesn’t change at all—just the professional title and salary. 

 

How to put this kind of promotion on a resume?

 

Simply stack your job titles in a single entry, and list your experience in a bullet point list underneath.

 

Follow standard resume formatting rules, i.e. add the name of the company you worked for, your job titles, and dates worked, like so:

 

Sample Resume—Multiple Positions at the Same Company

 

ABC Store, Los Angeles, CA

Store Manager (January 2013Present)

Assistant Manager (January 2012–January 2013)

  • [mention your promotion]
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • … 

Pro Tip: Stacking may not be the best strategy if you’re submitting your resume via an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). Why? ATSs will only parse a single job title per entry so the risk is they’ll miss one of them. If you’re writing an ATS-compliant resume (as opposed to the one you send directly to a human reader), it will be safer to use separate entries for each position you held.

Notice that the first bullet point on the list refers to your promotion.

 

That’s exactly what you should do on your resume. After all, getting a promotion is one of your biggest achievements, isn’t it?

 

Here are a couple of ideas on what this bullet point could look like:

 

  • Promoted to the position of store manager after less than a year for exceptional organizational skills and exceeding KPIs by 70%.

 

  • Repeatedly recognized for top performance through fast-track promotions and selection for high-priority initiatives.

 

  • Selected for management after demonstrating an ability to learn quickly and master complex concepts flawlessly.

 

See to it that the other bullet points mix your responsibilities with key achievements. This way your resume job description will have maximum impact. Don't worry about length. You should go as far back on your resume as possible while sticking to relevant experience.

Not sure how to present your experience in the most effective way? Read our dedicated guide: Resume Work Experience, History & Example Job Descriptions

2

Different Duties or Lateral Moves

 

If you were promoted to a position where your duties changed, create two separate entries for each of them.

 

To save space, you can use the company’s name as an umbrella title.

 

Start with the name of the company, location, and dates worked.

 

Next, list your current position. Add your experience bullet points. Again, make sure the first bullet point explains your promotion.

 

Then, add the previous internal position to your resume. If you held another one before that, add it below. As you go back in time, you can add fewer bullet points and less detail. Focus on the reasons leading up to each promotion. Then add your best achievements for each position.

 

Plus—

 

The same arrangement is suitable if your change of duties didn’t result from being promoted but from the so-called lateral move. This may happen when your company goes through a merger and you change the department, for instance.

Pro Tip: The best resume format is the chronological resume. In other words, you put your current/latest position first and then you go back in time. This way recruiters can see your latest and most relevant experience first.

Resume for Promotions Within the Same Company—Example

 

ABC Store, Los Angeles, CA

Store Manager (January 2013Present)

  • [mention your promotion]
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point

 

Assistant Manager (January 2012–January 2013)

  • [mention your promotion]
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point

 

Sales Clerk (June 2011–January 2012)

  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point

 

Remember—

 

You can improve your resume by letting it tell a story.

 

Don’t simply make a list of boring and repetitive responsible for experience bullets. Focus on your achievements instead. Let each bullet testify to your growth and show how good you are at delivering results. Best hack? Use action verbs on your resume. And always tailor it to the position you’re seeking.

 

When making a resume in our builder, drag & drop bullet points, skills, and auto-fill the boring stuff. Spell check? Check. Start building your resume here.

When you’re done, Zety’s resume builder will score your resume and tell you exactly how to make it better.

3

The Same Company Twice

 

There are situations in which you leave a company and come back after some time to take on a more senior role.

 

In such cases, you can list the same company twice.

 

Just like in the previous scenarios, stick to the chronological order of experience, and simply list the same company in two separate entries, like so:

 

Promotion on a Resume—Example

 

ABC Store, Los Angeles, CA

Store Manager (January 2013Present)

  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point

 

DEF Store, New York, NY

Assistant Manager (January 2012–January 2013)

  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point

 

ABC Store, Los Angeles, CA

Sales Clerk (June 2011–January 2012)

  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point
  • Experience Bullet Point

Pro Tip: Studies show that recruiters spend only about 7 seconds initially looking at your resume. In this short time, they scan for job titles. Keep this in mind when formatting your resume and make sure your job titles are easy to find.

The only difference in relation to the previous scenarios is that your career progression is pretty much self-explanatory as the dates and job titles on your resume clearly show it. That’s why there’s no need for you to add the extra bullet that explains your promotions.

Want to be sure your resume looks as professional as it can? Here’s a guide you should read: What Should a Resume Look Like? (Best Examples)

Plus, a great cover letter that matches your resume will give you an advantage over other candidates. You can write it in our cover letter builder here. Here's what it may look like:

 

matching set of resume and cover letter

See more cover letter templates and start writing.

 

Key Takeaway

 

If you have a lot of relevant experience, organizing a resume can be a daunting task. Especially when you’ve spent a lot of time with a single company and the last time you wrote a resume was several years ago (and it's time to update your resume!)

 

Here’s what you need to remember about listing promotions and multiple positions on a resume:

  • Be consistent with your resume design—however you choose to list promotions and multiple positions, stick to it throughout your resume.
  • Stack the positions that had similar duties in a single entry.
  • Write separate entries under the umbrella of the company name if the positions you held had different duties.
  • Add separate entries if you returned to the same company after some time elsewhere.
  • Consider listing every single position you’ve ever held in entirely separate entries if you’re submitting your resume via an Applicant Tracking System.

 

Do you have any questions about listing promotions on your resume? Maybe you’d like to share your thoughts? We’re always happy to hear from you. Give us a shout out in the comments below.

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Maciej Duszyński
Maciej is a career expert with a solid background in the education management industry. He's worked with people at all stages of their career paths: from interns to directors to C-suite members, he now helps you find your dream job.

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