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Resume for an Internal Position: Samples and Guide 2024

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Our customers have been hired by:

So you've found an interesting job opening? Cool! And it’s within the company you’re already employed in?! Even better!

Applying for an internal position might seem like a perfect move for your career. You know the people and what it’s like to work for the company. That means you’re already a step ahead of the external competitors. 

However! Landing an internal job might not be as simple as attending a quarterly all-hands call. To succeed, you need to ace your resume for an internal position! Let us walk you through it.

This guide will teach you:

  • A resume for an internal position sample better than 9 out of 10 other resumes.
  • How to add your current job description, education, and skills to a resume for an internal position.
  • What skills should you choose for your resume to get the internal position you’re after.
  • How to write a resume for an internal position to impress your hiring manager again.

Want to save time and have your resume ready in 5 minutes? Try our resume builder. It’s fast and easy to use. Plus, you’ll get ready-made content to add with one click. See 20+ resume templates and create your resume here.

Create your resume now

Sample resume made with our builder—See more resume examples here.

Looking for specific resume examples for internal positions? See some of our dedicated guides:

Still haven’t found what you’re looking for? Check out our General Resume Examples That Aren’t Generic.

You might wonder how to write a resume for a job. First, let’s have a look at a sample resume for an internal position of Content Marketing Manager:

Sample Resume for Internal Position

Graham Clarkson

Content Team Leader

623-474-8540

grahamclarkson@gmail.com

linkedin.com/in/grahamclarkson

twitter.com/grahamclarkson

Portfolio: clarksonwrites.com

Summary

Creative Content Team Leader with a background in SEO copywriting and 5+ years of experience creating content and leading the content team for a Tampa-based startup. Seeking an opportunity to leverage leadership excellence and enhance content quality in different areas while perfectly fitting into a new role within QuadRollin’ Techs. Boosted SEO traffic from 500k to 3 million monthly users in less than a year. Proficient in a range of communication formats, i.e., articles, blog posts, emails, podcasts, scripts, and social media. 

Experience

Content Team Leader

QuadRollin’ Techs

September 2016–March 2022

Key Qualifications & Responsibilities

  • Led a team of highly-skilled marketing specialists and boosted blog posts, SEO traffic, and social media ad conversions. Created and oversaw content creation for different channels, including newsletters, podcasts, social media & video content that reached 1 million + viewers globally.
  • Constructed a content marketing funnel that helped reduce the bounce rate to 35% in the first and 47% in the second year of implementation.
  • Created 50+ social media campaigns and help established a target group with over 1.42% CTR.
  • Supervised blog re-launch, from redesigning and UX and copywriting and SEO.

Key Achievements

  • Boosted the average blog post conversions by 10% in 3 months.
  • Boosted SEO traffic from 500k to 3 million monthly users in less than a year.
  • Assembled a team of highly-skilled content writers, video creators, graphic designers, and performance marketing specialists that boosted Instagram ad conversion by 25% in less than a year.

Senior Copywriter

Blue Dot LTD

February 2014–September 2016

Provided global copywriting support to marketing, sales, and PR teams to ensure clarity, consistency, and coherence throughout different channels.

  • Oversaw the entire website development in terms of content.
  • Created a newsletter strategy that boosted CTR by 40% in 6 months.
  • Wrote 100% blog posts for the internal blog at bluedot.com/blog.

Education

MS in Marketing

Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

September 2009–June 2013

  • Provided student tutoring to 20+ classmates.
  • President and organizer of the SEO Club.
  • President of the Advertisement & Marketing club.

Skills

  • Ahrefs
  • Semrush
  • Microsoft Office
  • R
  • CMS (i.e., WordPress, Joomla, Squarespace)
  • PPC & PPV Advertising
  • Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO)
  • Leadership
  • Content Creation
  • Text Editing
  • Photoshop

Certificates

  • Google Search Engine Optimization Fundamentals Certificate, 2021 
  • Google Digital Marketing & E-commerce Professional Certificate, 2020
  • HubSpot Inbound Marketing Certified, 2018

Languages

  • American English—Native 
  • Colombian Spanish—Conversational
  • Brazilian Portuguese—Limited working proficiency

Applying for an internal position with this resume sample will help you get that job you’re after. So let’s focus on creating one that would be tailored to your needs!

Here’s how to start a resume for an internal position you want to get.

1. Structure Your Internal Resume Perfectly

No matter what position you're applying to, it’s all about how your resume will look on the hiring manager's desk. And a good resume for an internal position needs to be just like a 1:1 kitchen conversation with your CEO—As adequate as possible. 

Here are some rules on how to format your resume for an internal position:

  • Add your contact information. Even though you might be working in the same open space with your hiring manager, it’s still a must-have in a resume header.
  • Select the best font for your resume. Calibri, Cambria, Helvetica, and Verdana are only some of the most suitable ones.
  • Make your file as readable as possible. Get there by setting standard resume margins to an inch on each side and a line spacing of 1.15.
  • Divide your resume into sections and categories. Stick to this outline to get the best effect:
    • Header (with your name, position, phone number, and e-mail address)
    • Summary Statement or Career Objective
    • Experience
    • Education
    • Useful skills
    • Extra sections (certifications you received, languages you speak, interests you have, etc.)
      This will make your resume easy to navigate and allow the hiring manager to learn more about you quickly.

Now you know how to structure a resume. Well done! You’re on your way to creating a perfect internal position resume. 

Now it’s time to learn how to write a resume summary or objective!

Learn more about current resume trends: The 3 Best Resume Formats to Use in 2024

2. Create a Work Experience Section That Will Improve Your Resume for an Internal Position

Did you know that according to the study, internal hiring is 6x more effective than all other sources of hiring? What does it mean to you as a candidate for the internal position? A hiring manager will perhaps rather choose you over an external candidate. 

But let’s not take things for granted!

You might know everyone in human resources. They might know your dog's name and your favorite type of coffee. But they might not know everything they need to know about your experience. 

Yet.

To describe your work experience on a resume for an internal position, follow these simple steps:

  • Use reverse-chronological format. Your recent activities should be at the top, as you’ve been carrying them out in the same company, and they are often the most relevant to the hiring manager.
  • Tailor your resume to the job description. That’s the easiest way to demonstrate that your experience is relevant and that you’re the perfect candidate for the job.
  • Apply the Problem-Action-Result (PAR) formula, which is an excellent way to highlight your achievements on a resume.
  • Choose action verbs, power words, adjectives, and synonyms. Emphasize your achievements and skills while being eloquent. Score!
  • Add up to six bullet points. The hiring managers don’t need to know every detail of your experience. Decide what matters the most for the job and make it count!

Pro Tip: Visit LinkedIn and make sure you have the correct job titles.

Let’s put that theory into action and see some examples.

Job Description for a Resume for an Internal Position [Promotion]

Right

Content Team Leader

QuadRollin’ Techs

September 2016 –March 2022

Key Qualifications & Responsibilities

  • Led a team of highly-skilled marketing specialists and boosted blog posts, SEO traffic, and social media ad conversions. Created and oversaw content creation for different channels, including newsletters, podcasts, social media & video content that reached 1 million + viewers globally.
  • Constructed a content marketing funnel that helped reduce the bounce rate to 35% in the first and 47% in the second year of implementation.
  • Created 50+ social media campaigns and help established a target group with over 1.42% CTR.
  • Supervised blog re-launch, from redesigning and UX and copywriting and SEO.

Key Achievements:

  • Boosted the average blog post conversions by 10% in 3 months.
  • Boosted SEO traffic from 500k to 3 million monthly users in less than a year.
  • Assembled a team of highly-skilled content writers, video creators, graphic designers, and performance marketing specialists that boosted Instagram ad conversion by 25% in less than a year.
Wrong

Content Team Leader

QuadRollin’ Techs

  • Content marketing funnel 
  • Social media campaigns
  • Blog re-launch
  • Writing newsletters
  • Writing blog posts
  • Writing copy for social media 
  • Leading a team

You get the idea. 

The first example gives you precise knowledge about the candidate. It includes relevant numbers and specific achievements. 

The second one only shows you what the candidate was doing. Was the candidate performing well? Probably not, since there’s no mention of the results…

But what about changing a career within the same company, i.e., to an SEO Specialist? In this case, highlight the experience gained in the current and previous jobs that can be relevant to the job you’re trying to land.

Job Description for a Resume for an Internal Position [Career Change]

Right

Content Team Leader

QuadRollin’ Techs

September 2016 –March 2022

Key Qualifications & Responsibilities

Led a team of highly-skilled marketing specialists and boosted blog posts, SEO traffic, and social media ad conversions, cooperating closely with the SEO team.

  • Supervised blog re-launch, from redesigning and UX and copywriting and SEO.
  • Optimized 500+ blog posts according to guidelines delivered by the SEO team.
  • Oversaw the creation of 50+ SEO-optimized blog posts for the company’s internal blog.
Wrong

Content Team Leader

QuadRollin’ Techs

  • Written SEO-friendly content.
  • Created 50+ social media campaigns.

Once again, the description written by the first candidate is filled with specifics and ready to go. 

The second one is not really relevant. The candidate needs to fix it before looking back to college years…

Education – that’s the next stop on our journey toward a perfect internal position resume!

Read more: How to Show a Promotion on a Resume (or Multiple Positions) 

When making a resume in our builder, drag & drop bullet points, skills, and auto-fill the boring stuff. Spell check? Check. Start building a professional resume template here for free.

When you’re done, our easy resume builder will score your resume and our resume checker will tell you exactly how to make it better.

3. Write about Your Education to Improve Your Resume for an Internal Position

Did you know that, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, workers tend to remain in their jobs for an average of 4.1 years?

Changing position is not that rare. And if your education can have an impact on the change you’re about to make, it’s definitely worth mentioning.

A good example of an education section for when you try to change your career? There you go!

Internal Resume Example [Education]

Right

MS in Marketing, 

Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

September 2009–June 2013

  • Provided student tutoring to 20+ classmates.
  • President and organizer of SEO Club.
  • President of Advertisement & Marketing club.

See? It’s that simple to prove to the hiring manager that you have been passionate about SEO since waaay back. 

4. List of Skills Relevant to the Internal Position You’re Applying for

Before choosing which skills you should include in your resume, you need to identify them. Read the job description carefully and go through what you have already written. 

All the skills should be relevant to the job you’re trying to get. You can also add some transferable skills that didn’t fit into previous sections. 

And think about interpersonal skills that might improve your resume for an internal position you’re after. Anything that can help you, really!

Remember to keep it short. Choose 5-10 most suitable for the job.

Once again, let’s focus on our example and on what the list of skills required for the Content Marketing Manager might look like:

Resume for an Internal Position Skills 

Set of skills already making a huge impression? Now go back to your work experience once again. 

Are the skills reflected in the bullet points that describe your experience? If not, try paraphrasing them, so they are visible throughout your resume.

Need more inspiration? We’ve got you covered. Read our list: Skills to Put on Resume

5. Time to Brag: Add Other Sections to Your Resume for an Internal Position

How does it feel to have an example of a perfect internal resume in front of you? 

Probably almost as good as getting that job within a company you know so well, huh? 

Well, let’s put some more work into it, and soon enough, you’ll be able to make this comparison!

You can include some of these examples while creating an internal position resume for promotion within the same company or for a career change.

1. Licenses & Certifications

Choosing between two similar candidates can be tricky if none of them is certified. Get the advantage and put relevant licenses and certifications into your resume. Who knows, perhaps that will get you the job you want.

2. Foreign Language Skills

Can this new position benefit from the fact that you’re a polyglot? Does the new team have members from all over the world? If so, do not hesitate to highlight your language skills in your resume!

3. Conferences

Attending conferences show that you care about your career and about your future. Someone who does that AND is willing to move to a different position WITHIN a company seems like someone who can be hired for years to come!

4. Volunteering Experience

Something hiring managers absolutely love. It shows empathy and willingness to work! And it can easily be a conversation starter or even a winning point.

5. Professional Associations

Being a part of an association relevant to the new position in your company can only help you win the job. And being a part of an association not relevant to it only shows that you are active in your free time!

6. Hobbies & Interests

What you do in your spare time can easily prove both your hard and soft skills. Playing football? Probably a team player with a work ethic. Traveling? Must be organized and probably knows foreign languages. Amateur theater? Someone’s confident and has a good memory!

7. Resume Professional References

Including references on your resume might be a perfect idea when applying for a job within the same company. Your current supervisor knows you well and is probably well-known to other supervisors, including, perhaps, your future one!

See these internal position resume samples for other sections:

Resume for Internal Position Other Sections Examples 

Right

Certificates

  • Google Search Engine Optimization Fundamentals Certificate, 2021 
  • Google Digital Marketing & E-commerce Professional Certificate, 2020
  • HubSpot Inbound Marketing Certified, 2018

Languages

  • American English—Native 
  • Colombian Spanish—Conversational
  • Brazilian Portuguese—Limited working proficiency
Wrong

Certificates

  • SEO
  • Copywriting
  • Marketing

Languages

  • English
  • Spanish

Clearly, the first example works better. It gives specific information on certifications and the level of language proficiency of the first candidate. 

The second candidate, on the other hand, might have an SEO certificate bought on some shady website. And when it comes to languages, No hablo español might be the only full sentence behind this “Spanish” bullet point.

So that’s almost it for the resume for an internal position. Yay!

But that doesn’t mean you’re good to apply! 

Not just yet!

6. Create a Perfect Resume Summary or Objective for an Internal Position

According to the study, an average employer looks at a resume for 7.4 seconds. 

That’s not a lot. Even when the name they see on a resume rings a bell. And sure, you might gamble and think you will grab their attention by having their (your!) company name at the top of the experience section.

However—

It’s not a casual game of foosball in your chill-out room during a lunch break. It’s your career we’re talking about! So, there’s no room for gambling! 

But there’s room for a good kick-off of your internal position resume with a spotless resume summary or objective

What’s the difference between these two, and which one should you use when applying for an internal position?

  • A professional resume summary is great for an already experienced worker. It can be a perfect summary of accomplishments that includes suitable skills and experience required for the opening in your company.
  • A resume objective is dedicated to a novice or a career-changer. It can be a perfect way to demonstrate your most relevant skills and your goals. 

Both summary and objective can be used when applying for an internal position.

  • If you want to get promoted, you should write a resume summary.
  • If you are looking for a different development path, you should write a resume objective.

It’s that simple. Sure, but how to do it?

Let’s start by following these three steps:

  • Write your summary or objective last! First, read your entire resume. Both summary and objective are summarizations of your selling points. Focusing on them after your resume is done seems like the right way to do it, doesn’t it?
  • Choose 2–3 achievements and skills from your resume. Read a job offer once again and pick what seems best for the opening. It should all be there!
  • Use the following formula to structure your summary or objective:

Adjective + Job Title + Years of Experience + Achievements + Skills + What You Want to Do for the Employer 

As you can see, there is an easy way to create a well-constructed intro to any resume for an internal position. 

So now it’s time for some examples of dos and don'ts. 

Resume for an Internal Position Summary Example

Right
Creative content team leader with a background in SEO copywriting and 5+ years of experience creating content and leading the content team for a Tampa-based startup. Seeking an opportunity to leverage leadership excellence and enhance content quality in different areas while fitting into a new role within QuadRollin’ Techs. Boosted SEO traffic from 500k to 3 million monthly users in less than a year. Proficient in a range of communication formats, i.e., articles, blog posts, emails, podcasts, scripts, and social media.
Wrong
A content team leader with a huge experience in different writing formats. Leading a team of marketing specialists, creating our company's blog posts, social media posts, and general content. Would love to become a leader of a bigger team and make QuadRollin’ Techs even better!

The difference between a well-written resume summary and one that won’t work is pretty simple. Referring to your key achievements on a resume and including relevant numbers will always position you as a professional candidate for the opening.

But let’s say you don’t have that much experience, which is rather often when trying to change a career. In that case, feature your valuable qualities and try to focus on your skills and your goals.

Let’s see some examples!

Resume for an Internal Position Objective Example

Right
Highly-motivated content team leader with SEO knowledge, skilled in Ahrefs, SEMrush, and R. Master degree in Marketing at Ohio State University, where I was a president and organizer of the SEO Club and a president of the Advertisement & Marketing Club. Currently looking for an opportunity to use my SEO-related knowledge while improving my skills and shifting my career to become an SEO Specialist within our company.
Wrong
I am currently employed as a content team leader in our company. Would love to become an SEO Specialist, as my knowledge and skills make me a perfect candidate for this opening.

The first example is relevant to the job. The second one? Change the “SEO Specialist” to anything else, and you’ve got the same irrelevant objective. Which is never a good thing.

You have their attention. Now convince them you’re the best candidate. The easiest way to do it? Talk about your experience!

Pro Tip: Use the PDF format for your resume unless the opening ad explicitly says that you should submit a DOC. file instead.

7. Write a Cover Letter to Support Your Resume for an Internal Position

Before sending your resume, there’s one more thing you need to do. 

Show the hiring manager that you're qualified, determined, ambitious, and ready to take on the new role within your organization. 

How can you do it? 

By writing a cover letter for an internal position or promotion.

Following some basic steps seems like a good idea!

How to write a cover letter for an internal position:

  1. Make sure you know how to format a cover letter. Your resume looks neat. And so should your cover letter!
  2. Write a captivating start for a cover letter. The first paragraph should really catch their attention!
  3. Keep the correct length of your cover letter. It should contain 3 to 4 paragraphs and no more than 400 words. That’s one page. 
  4. Create a great ending to a cover letter. These are the words you’ll leave the hiring manager with. And they can help you be remembered!

Chose the right cover letter template. Try to make it consistent with your resume template. It can work magic and get you covered!

Read more: Do I Need a Cover Letter? Are Cover Letters Necessary in 2024

Plus, a great cover letter that matches your resume will give you an advantage over other candidates. You can write it in our cover letter builder here. Here's what it may look like:

See more cover letter templates and start writing.

Key Takeaway

All done. 

You’re ready to approach your hiring manager or your potential future manager and ask them if they received your application.

Just a quick recap of how to write a resume for an internal position:

  • Format your resume for an internal position, and make sure you put your experience in reverse-chronological order.
  • Create a resume summary or objective, depending on whether you try to apply for a higher or completely different job within your company.
  • Focus on how your education might prove to your hiring manager that you’re a great fit for the job.
  • Think about the skills required for the opening and make sure they are reflected in your experience and education sections.
  • Include additional information, like courses or certificates, that might help you land the job.
  • Write a cover letter for an internal position to improve your application and make it consistent with your resume.

That’s it! Now, go and get that internal position. Good luck!

BTW, we’d love to hear from you: 

  • What’s the most difficult part of applying for an internal position? 
  • Do you need more job-getting accomplishments?
  • Are you afraid your cover letter might backfire?

Let’s chat! Feel invited to the comments section below. And thank you so much for reading!

About Zety’s Editorial Process

This article has been reviewed by our editorial team to make sure it follows Zety's editorial guidelines. We’re committed to sharing our expertise and giving you trustworthy career advice tailored to your needs. High-quality content is what brings over 40 million readers to our site every year. But we don't stop there. Our team conducts original research to understand the job market better, and we pride ourselves on being quoted by top universities and prime media outlets from around the world.

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Maciej Tomaszewicz, CPRW
Maciej is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer and career expert and resume writer with a versatile professional background, creating tools for job seekers in various industries. His creative writing background and HR-related experience allow him to create highly readable articles clarifying even the most complicated professional development aspects. Since 2022, he has authored guides on professional resumes and cover letters, written articles on work-related scenarios, and developed research-based career advice.
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