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Travel Nurse Resume: Examples and Guide [10+ Tips]

Travel Nurse Resume: Examples and Guide [10+ Tips]

Travel nurses are raking in the crazy money now, and your skills are Mayo-Clinic-ready. Now get the job with a travel nurse resume that puts you on the ward.

How does $4,000 a week sound, plus per-diem? Pretty good? But not so fast. To steer clear of the nail-biter jobs in hazardous facilities, you need a travel nurse resume that shines like ER lights. And fast, please, because the clock is ticking. Sound like a big hurdle?

 

Fear not.

 

With the right snapshots of your past work in a trusted resume format, you’ll be booking flights and packing your Dansko’s in a hurry. 

 

Ready? Let’s get you a jaw-dropping resume for travel nurse jobs.

 

Want to save time and have your resume ready in 5 minutes? Try our resume builder. It’s fast and easy to use. Plus, you’ll get ready-made content to add with one click. See 20+ resume templates and create your resume here.

 

travel nurse resume templates

Sample resume made with our builder—See more templates and create your resume here.

 

Want more healthcare and nursing resume examples? Here you go:

 

Sample Travel Nurse Resume Template

 

Jo-Beth Dickey

jobethzdickey@gmail.com

304-922-9023

linkedin.com/in/jobethzdickey

 

Resume Summary

 

Licensed RN and travel nurse with 6+ years of experience. Skilled in patient care, education, and infectious disease control. Seeking to take the burden off healthcare teams at Tampa General Medical Center. Operated ventilators during 40+ shifts and instructed ~15 precept nurses in gloving and gowning at Barstow RMH.

 

License

 

  • Registered Nurse, West Virginia Board of Nursing. License #0000000

 

Work Experience

 

Travel Nurse

Barstow RMH, AZ

March 2020 – June 2020

  • Worked in 25-bed infectious disease ward, conducting patient care, education, nurse training, wound dressing, intake, and discharge.
  • Instructed ~15 precept nurses in best practices for gloving and gowning. Result: RNs who had been failing to glove and gown achieved 99% compliance.
  • Helped reduce regulated medical waste costs 50% by leading a program to label non-regulated bins more clearly and train all support staff in the difference.
  • Operated APAP and BiPAP ventilators in more than 40 shifts.
  • Helped raise HCAHPS scores ~20% by using verbal and written communication scores to improve patient education.

 

RN

Bluefield CMC, WV

June 2016 – Feb 2020

  • Worked in a 20-bed infectious disease ward for 4 years.
  • Collaborated with 6 nurses, 3 doctors, and 2 hospital administrators to rewrite and improve disease transmission protocols, resulting in 30% less risk.
  • Traveled to satellite facilities 20+ times per year to fill in and provide guidance.

 

Precept Nurse

Alliance Street Health

2016

 

Education

 

Saint Mary’s School of Nursing, WV

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Graduated: June 2016

  • Member, Student Nursing Association
  • Excelled in infectious disease coursework.

 

Certifications

 

  • CIC Infection Prevention, APIC
  • Patient Care Technician

 

Core Skills

 

  • Hard Skills: Infectious disease control, patient education, record keeping, ventilator operation
  • Soft Skills: interpersonal skills, compassion, communication, teamwork

 

Additional Achievements

 

  • Volunteer dog walker 2x monthly, Bluefield Animal Shelter
  • Avid runner for stress management and self care

 

 

Here’s how to write your own Berkeley-Wellness-ready travel nurse resume:

 

1. Format Your Travel Nurse Resume Correctly

 

Get off on the right foot with the best resume layout. The charge nurse or hospital administrator can tell a lot about you just by glancing at your resume. If you’re sloppy, they’ll picture you not gloving and gowning when it’s not convenient or cutting corners.

 

The best resume formats follow a few simple tips::

  • Use the chronological resume format to show your most recent experience first. It helps hiring managers get a clear glimpse at who you are right now.
  • Clear resume headings make it easy to find your phone number, email, and other key contact info on a resume like a LinkedIn profile.
  • There’s no single best font for resumes, but Arial is respected, as are Didot and Cambria. Pick one that’s easy to read because it’s simple and no-frills.
  • To name a resume file, follow this format: “Name - Job Title - Resume.pdf”
  • Why is the best resume format PDF? Because MS Word resumes deteriorate rapidly once you move them to a different device. PDFs don’t.

 

How long should my resume be for travel nurse jobs?” If you have less than 7 years of experience, one page is best. Got more? You can have a 2-page resume, but only if it’s brimming with RN accomplishments. (Not job duties!)

Make all these formatting questions evaporate by starting with a great template. See our selection: Eye-Catching Resume Templates

2. Drop Jaws with a Resume Profile Statement

 

“Let me tell you all about myself. When I was nine...” Argh! Nope. You need an elevator speech at the top of your travel nurse resume. It’s called a resume profile, and it’s the part that gets the hiring team to read more. Without it, most will ditch your resume in seven seconds.

 

But there’s no one-size-fits-all introduction for a resume. If you’re writing a resume with no experience, then you need to write a resume objective. In it, tell the hospital or clinic how you hope to help them treat their patients.

 

If you were walking wards before Florence Nightingale, write a professional summary. It looks the same as an objective—a single paragraph—but it adds a couple of your shining travel nurse moments.

Read more: What to Put on a Resume: Good Things You Should Include

3. Customize Your Travel Nurse Job Description

 

Ready for the one tip that will get you hired? Avoid writing a cookie-cutter travel nurse resume, packed with all your job duties. Did you treat patients? Educate them? Administer medications? So did every other travel nurse applicant. So how do you get hired?

 

By knowing how to tailor resume for a specific job.

 

To tailor-fit your experience on a resume:

  • Use the same job title for your past jobs that they put on their job description. If they want an ICU travel nurse, don’t say you were an intensive care travel nurse.
  • Add the facility name for each past employer, plus where they’re located and the years and months you worked there.
  • Add 3–5 bullet points to each job, but—nevermind what you were “responsible for.” Use action words instead to show what you achieved.
  • Want some good accomplishments for resumes for travel nurse jobs? Number of beds on your ward, costs reduced, and anything with measured improvements.

Read more: What Does Relevant Experience Mean? [With Examples]

4. Ink In Your Travel Nurse Resume Education Section 

Can listing education on a resume get you hired? It can if you do it the right way. You could just list your school, degree, and graduation date. Or you could go the extra millimeter and add proof of your technical and soft skills. Guess which method gets more jobs?

 

Follow these key resume tips:

  • To list a degree on a resume, start with your degree and the name of the nursing school you went to.
  • Add one or two accomplishments from your schooling or clinical experience.
  • Don’t list your GPA on a resume unless it was blisteringly high or very recent

 

Read more: How to List a Minor and Major on a Resume

5. Prove the Traveling Nurse Skills the Facility Wants

 

What are the right skills for a job as a travel nurse? That depends on the job ad. You can’t just list all your nursing skills and hope they’ll hire you. That’s like administering random meds without a diagnosis. Choosing the right skills means using the right resume keywords. This approach will make your resume ATS-compliant.

 

Here's how to add travel nurse skills to a resume:

  • Jot down all the nursing skills you see in the job posting.
  • Separate your list into soft skills vs hard skills. Soft skills are things like compassion, efficiency, and teamwork.
  • Note any technical skills you see too. Technical skills for resumes for travel nurse jobs include working with BiPAP ventilators or administering tube feedings.
  • Write a skills list with your best 10 travel nursing skills from the bunch.
  • Next, double-check your work history. Tweak your achievements, so they prove you’ve done great things with those skills.

 

Travel Nurse Resume Skills

 

Pro Tip: Travel nurses make the most money in New York and the least in North Carolina. Know travel nurse salary by state to get the highest-paying jobs.

When making a resume in our builder, drag & drop bullet points, skills, and auto-fill the boring stuff. Spell check? Check. Start building your resume here.

When you’re done, Zety’s resume builder will score your resume and tell you exactly how to make it better.

6. Add Extras to Your Travel Nurse Resume

 

Who are you as a person? The charge nurse wants to know. Have you got tons of energy and are you great to work with? You can answer “yes” by adding a few bonus sections to your resume for travel nurse jobs.

 

Here’s how:

Read more: What Are the Key Sections in a Resume?

7. Write a Cover Letter for Your Traveling Nurse Resume

 

Should you write a cover letter for travel nurse resumes? Every time. Without a resume cover page, the charge nurse might think you’re applying to 100 RN jobs a day. With a cover letter, he can see you care about this job.

 

But—

 

The structure of a cover letter matters.

Read more: Nursing Cover Letter Example

Plus, a great cover letter that matches your resume will give you an advantage over other candidates. You can write it in our cover letter builder here. Here's what it may look like:

 

matching set of resume and cover letter

See more cover letter templates and start writing.

That’s it!

 

That’s everything you need to write a healthy traveling nurse resume!

 

Thanks for reading! Still have doubts about how to write a Harvard-Health-level travel nursing resume? Give us a shout in the comments section!

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Tom Gerencer, CPRW
Tom Gerencer, a Certified Professional Résumé Writer (CPRW), is a career expert who has published over 200 in-depth articles on Zety. Since 2016, he has been sharing advice on all things recruitment from writing winning resumes and cover letters to getting a promotion.
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