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Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Resume Examples

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As a certified nursing assistant, you make a difference in your patients’ lives on a daily basis. Now, allow me to help you write a remarkable CNA resume. I promise it will make a difference in your life. Read this guide, see great CNA resume examples, and boost your chances of landing the nursing job of your dreams.

This guide will show you:

  • A CNA resume example better than 9 out of 10 other resumes.
  • How to write a certified nursing assistant resume that will land you more interviews.
  • Tips and examples on how to show off your CNA resume skills.
  • How to prepare a CNA job description for a resume to get any job you want.

Want to save time and have your resume ready in 5 minutes? Try our resume builder. It’s fast and easy to use. Plus, you’ll get ready-made content to add with one click. See 20+ resume templates and create your resume here.

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Sample resume made with our builder—See more resume examples here.

Looking for a different nursing job? Visit our other guides:

CNA Resume Example

John Q. Heartman

Certified Nursing Assistant

123-456-7890

johnqheartman@email.com

linkedin.com/in/john.q.heartman

Resume Summary

Compassionate, patient-oriented Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) with over 10 years of experience providing personalized patient care. Seeking to enhance patient care at Health Care Inc. while bringing a deep understanding of patient hygiene and bedside care. At Compass Services, successfully helped reduce fall rates by 40%.

Work Experience

Certified Nursing Assistant

Compass Services, Stamford, CT

August 2016–Present

Key Qualifications & Responsibilities

  • Provided daily living services to 40+ patients, including bathing, dressing, and grooming.
  • Tracked the patients' daily intake of medicine.
  • Assisted nurses with procedures and treatments.
  • Implemented a new mobility assistance program.

Key Achievement:

  • Reduced patient falls by 40% thanks to my new mobility assistance program.

Certified Nursing Assistant

Caring Hands Health, Stamford, CT

June 2014–August 2016

Key Qualifications & Responsibilities

  • Assisted with daily living activities for 20+ elderly patients.
  • Administered bedside care, including vital sign monitoring and medication administration.
  • Implemented a new patient-care protocol that improved patient comfort levels.

Key Achievement:

  • Achieved 95% in patient satisfaction scores.

Education

Sheriden Woods Health Center Nurse Assistant Program

Bristol, Connecticut, May 2007

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) 2007

  • Completed 124 hours of Classroom and Clinical Training.

Certifications

  • Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), Connecticut State Board, 2014

Skills

  • Patient Care
  • Vital Sign Monitoring
  • Medication Administration
  • Proficiency in Medical Emergency Equipment
  • Patient Hygiene
  • Communication
  • Compassion
  • Attention To Detail
  • Time Management
  • Empathy

Languages

  • English—Native
  • Spanish—Beginner

Interests

  • Participating in community fitness activities.

Volunteer Experience 

  • Volunteering at local health fairs.

What a great CNA resume example. Soon you’ll have one that’s just as impressive as this one, if not more! Let’s begin.

1. Choose the Correct CNA Resume Template

I believe the best way to create a good resume is by following some strict procedures and the right order of things. The same thing probably applies to your day-to-day nursing work as well. Let’s follow this approach from the top and see what your resume should look like.

Here’s how to create the correct resume format:

Now that our resume structure is ready, let’s start the writing procedure. I promise it will be completely painless!

Pro Tip: At this point, you might already be wondering how many pages should a resume be. It depends on your work history. You can write a two-page resume if you have plenty of relevant nursing experience. However, a one-page resume will work better if you’ve been a nurse for less than seven years.

2. Shine With a Detailed Work Experience Section on Your CNA Resume

The Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the overall employment of CNAs is projected to grow faster than the national average for all occupations. This will result in two outcomes: the CNA job openings will grow, which is good. However, so will the number of other certified nurses. 

The competition might get fierce, but with this guide, you’ll have a resume almost as rewarding as a patient thanking you for your help. But to do it, you must create what’s perhaps the most important section of your resume. You must emphasize your exceptional work experience.

Here’s the right way of bringing out your professional experience on a certified nursing assistant resume:

  • Follow the reverse-chronological resume format. Listing your last job first makes it easier for the reader to see your current qualifications immediately.
  • Avoid listing your duties. Other candidates have probably done similar things. List your accomplishment examples instead, as they characterize experienced professionals.
  • Use bullet points on a resume to once more boost its readability.
  • Illustrate your accomplishments with action words for a resume. It will make your document stand out from other applications even more. Some of these words include: administered, facilitated, helped, identified, measured, monitored, provided, and supported.
  • Enclose numbers to highlight the measured results of your work. 
  • Draw readers’ attention to your most remarkable achievement. Add it separately and call it a Key Achievement

This is what this CNA job description for a resume can look like:

CNA Resume Examples [Work Experience Section]

Right

Certified Nursing Assistant

Compass Services, Stamford, CT

August 2016–Present

Key Qualifications & Responsibilities

  • Provided daily living services to 40+ patients, including bathing, dressing, and grooming.
  • Tracked the patients' daily intake of medicine.
  • Assisted nurses with procedures and treatments.
  • Implemented a new mobility assistance program.

Key Achievement:

  • Reduced patient falls by 40% thanks to my new mobility assistance program.
Wrong

Compass Services, Stamford, CT

  • Responsible for communication with staff and patients.
  • Keeping patient information private.
  • Responsible for managing resources.
  • Responsible for system supervision.

The first example provides a perfect overview of the candidate's workplace achievements. It uses action words, contains the numbers, and finishes with a separate key achievement. 

The second candidate lists only responsibilities. And three out of four bullet points start the same. Your resume should read well and not make readers sick from boredom.

But what if you’re writing a beginner CNA resume?

Beginner CNA Resume Examples With No Experience

Right

Nursing Experience

  • Providing daily care for physically limited grandmother with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Member of the HOSA-Future Health Professionals (since 2018)
  • Additional Training: CPR and First Aid, American Red Cross
Wrong

Experience

  • Occasionally helped with tasks for an elderly family member with limited mobility.
  • Maintain a personal garden, demonstrating attention to detail and organizational skills.
  • Completed an introductory online yoga course to explore wellness practices.

As you can see, it’s possible to write a good CNA resume with no experience. Training and membership in the first example show a real passion for the nursing profession. Providing daily care is not a certified experience, but it is definitely impressive and useful in upcoming tasks.

The second example shows some interest in the general area of expertise. But with no training, certificate, or membership, it won’t be enough to get hired.

Making your resume look impressive is crucial. You’re on the right track! Keep doing it in each section, including the next one: your education section.

Pro Tip: I recommended a reverse-chronological, but there are more resume formats to choose from. You can write a skill-based resume if you have many skills and not as much experience. And if you want to combine very special skills with some experience, choose a combination resume format instead.

Creating a resume with our builder is incredibly simple. Follow our step-by-step guide and use content from Certified Professional Resume Writers to have a resume ready in minutes.

When you’re done, Zety’s resume builder will score your resume and our resume checker will tell you exactly how to make it better.

3. Attend to Your CNA Resume Education Section

Your CNA resume must give the education section the right treatment. After all, you wouldn’t become a certified nursing assistant without it, right?

Here’s how to demonstrate your educational background on a certified nurse resume:

You’ve got the know-how. Now, let’s see some examples.

Sample CNA Resume [Education Section]

Right

Sheriden Woods Health Center Nurse Assistant Program

Bristol, Connecticut, May 2007

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) 2007

  • Completed 124 hours of Classroom and Clinical Training.
Wrong

Geriatric Nursing Assistant (Certified in Utah)

The first candidate gave the recruiter every detail I listed above, providing a complete education section. Plus, there’s a great detail regarding the completed course. 

The second doesn’t give any information apart from the state. And that’s not enough at all.

Pro Tip: If you're unsure how far back your resume should go, try not to go back more than 20 years unless specifically requested.

4. Include Your Certifications on Your CNA Resume

You’re a certified nursing assistant. It means your certificates matter. And trust me, your potential employer will look for them on your resume. Especially since, to become a certified nursing assistant, you must undergo state-approved training and pass a certification exam. That’s why you must always remember to add certifications to your resume.

Here’s what to include when listing certifications on a resume for a nursing assistant:

  • Certification Title
  • Certifying Organization
  • Year of Attainment 

Looks way easier than measuring bodily fluids, right? Let’s take a quick look at one example.

CNA Resume Template: Certifications

Right

Certifications

  • Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), Connecticut State Board, 2014

All three things are included. Let’s move on to something a bit trickier: your skills.

Pro Tip: CNA certifications typically remain valid for two years in most states. Each state has a different way of renewing it, so ensure you find out how to do it way before the expiration date. 

5. Show Your Remarkable CNA Resume Skills

We’ve shown your education and work experience, so it’s time to focus on your resume skills. You may have many, but not all should find their place on your CNA resume skills list.

Follow the plan below to diagnose which ones to include in your resume.

  1. Read the CNA job description carefully. You’ll find all the skills you need to write a tailored resume that screams you want this particular job and not just any other. 
  2. Create a list of all the skills that seem relevant to the job you’re after. 
  3. See which of your skills overlap with those listed in the job ad.
  4. Put up to ten soft and hard skills examples that the company you’re applying to prioritizes. 
  5. Place your top nursing skills strategically in the other CNA resume sections as well.

Let’s take a look at the CNA skills list.

CNA Skills for a Resume

It’s a list that goes on and on, just like your significant daily duties. But you can only put ten skills on a resume. So what can a well-crafted selection look like?

CNA Skills [Resume Example]

  • Patient Care
  • Vital Sign Monitoring
  • Medication Administration
  • Proficiency in Medical Emergency Equipment
  • Patient Hygiene
  • Communication
  • Compassion
  • Attention To Detail
  • Time Management
  • Empathy

You certainly have something more to mention that won’t fit all the described sections. Luckily, you can include even more impressive information about yourself on your resume!

Those soft skills can be tricky. But don’t you worry, we’ve got a guide for that! Read it here: How to List Soft Skills on a Resume

6. Consider Adding Extra Sections to Your CNA Resume

Putting additional information on your resume can benefit you. But you need to keep one word in mind: relevance. Don’t just list anything you think your employer might find attractive. Focus only on things that can mirror your soft skills, prove your hard skills, or show personality details.

Here are some sections you can add to make your CNA resume stand out even more:

  • Language Skills are always valuable. You never know who you’re going to work with.
  • Hobbies and Interests can tell recruiters a lot about you.
  • Volunteer Work is always impressive, no matter the job position. But in your profession, it’s worth your weight in gold.

Let’s see some examples:

CNA Resume—Example of Additional Sections

Right

Languages

  • English—Native
  • Spanish—Beginner

Interests

  • Participating in community fitness activities.

Volunteer Experience 

  • Volunteering at local health fairs.
Wrong

Interests

  • Sports
  • Cinema
  • Techno Music

Things listed in the first example seem relevant to the position you’re after. And they are impressive. Even the novice Spanish proficiency level shows you’re eager to learn new things. 

Regarding the second example: how is techno music relevant to the certified nursing assistant? I don’t know, but if you do, please leave a comment below!

But first, let’s move on with our guide, as we’re nearly finished. Time to reflect on what you’ve written because that’s what you always do when creating a profile for a resume.

Did you directly observe the work of a doctor? Read our guide: Shadowing on a Resume

7. Write a Riveting CNA Resume Objective or Summary

The six seconds a recruiter spends on a resume are often spent looking at its opening paragraph. And it's either a CNA resume summary or a CNA resume objective.

Here’s how the two differ from one another:

  • A resume summary is a perfect choice for candidates with relevant work experience of at least two years. It focuses on your work-related achievements. 
  • A resume objective is great for candidates with little to no experience or career changers. It focuses on your transferable skills and your goals.

Here’s how to write each of them:

CNA Resume Summary Formula

Adjective + Certified Nursing Assistant + Years of Experience + Achievements + Skills + What You Want to Do for the Employer 

CNA Resume Objective Formula

Adjective(s)/Certificate(s) + Your Job Title or Degree + seeking employment as a Certified Nursing Assistantat + Company Name + to apply my + Your Relevant Skills + to help + What Do You Want To Help The Company Achieve

You should write them both at the very end. This way, it will be much easier for you to pick out your career highlights.

Let’s see some professional summary examples first.

CNA Resume Summary—Example

Right

Compassionate, patient-oriented Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) with over 10 years of experience providing personalized patient care. Seeking to enhance patient care at Health Care Inc. while bringing a deep understanding of patient hygiene and bedside care. At Compass Services, successfully helped reduce fall rates by 40%.

Wrong

CNA with 10 years of professional experience looking for a nursing assistant job at your facility for seniors.

The right example starts with an impressive resume headline, describes the experience, mentions skills, refers to the company by name, shows accomplishments, and includes numbers that show the impact. Very professional!

The wrong one is so basic it won’t be remembered as impressive, which is not how you get hired. Not professional at all!

Now, let’s see what the CNA resume objective should look like.

CNA Objective—Resume Example

Right

A dedicated, newly licensed CNA 2019 graduate seeking to use nursing care and advocacy skills in an assisted living setting at Sunsetters Retirement Home. Previous internship experience in providing basic care for 5+ elderly patients. CPR certified.

Wrong

A fresh grad looking for the first job as a certified nursing assistant.

Even though the first example may come from a CNA resume with no experience, the candidate looks super qualified for the nursing assistant job. This sample mentions an internship, skills, and certifications. They also name the company and deliver quantifiable achievements. 

The wrong example, on the other hand, is missing all these. It tells recruiters what they already know seeing a resume: this person wants a job. And that’s not enough to get hired unless your employer is really desperate.

Now that your resume is 100% complete, it’s time to find out how to write an accompanying cover letter.

Pro Tip: Choose the proper resume file name when saving your CNA resume. Your name +Resume should be enough. However, I always recommend Your Name +Job Title+ Resume, to avoid confusion. Plus, always send your document as a PDF resume file unless stated differently in the job ad.

8. Add a Cover Letter to Your CNA Resume to Secure a Job Interview

Are cover letters necessary? Let’s put it that way: Half the recruiters expect candidates to submit them. Don’t take a risk, hoping you’ll outrun the competition only with your resume, no matter how impressive it is. Always include your nursing cover letter.

Here’s how to write a cover letter.

  • Create a professional cover letter header. Make a great impression from the very top.
  • Start your cover letter with a correct salutation. Try to avoid the“To Whom It May Concern” line, as it is very impersonal. Start with your recipient’s name. You’ll find it on the company’s website, and if that fails, you can always call and ask to whom you should send your application documents.
  • Mention the company name to make it even more personal, and tell the recruiter what you can offer. Remember that it’s not only about how great you are. You’ve explained that in your resume. In your cover letter, express how the company will benefit from hiring you.
  • End your cover letter with a statement that will call the recruiter to take action. Offer a precise date for a meeting or a call. It seems bold, but it works!
  • Add a professional cover letter signature, repeating your contact information from the header. You don’t want that part to get lost!
  • Keep the right cover letter length. Don’t go over one page.

You know how to write a resume, and you know what’s the correct cover letter format. Let’s do a brief recap!

Want to create a neat resume that’s simple yet brilliant? Visit our guide: Minimalist Resume

Plus, a great cover letter that matches your resume will give you an advantage over other candidates. You can write it in our cover letter builder here. Here's what it may look like:

See more cover letter templates and start writing.

Key Takeaway

Seems like this patient (your resume) is ready to leave the facility (drafts in your mailbox). Let’s go through what we’ve learned here today.

  • Build your resume from all the important sections. 
  • Choose the correct font, keep the right margins, and proper spacing to make it readable.
  • Highlight your work experience in reverse chronological order, making it easier for the reader to see the newest achievements. And emphasize these achievements!
  • Add not only your education but also your certification.
  • Select up to ten resume skills that are most relevant for the job you’re after.
  • Include additional information, such as language skills, volunteer experience, and interests that might impress the recruiter.
  • Write an opening paragraph to your resume once all the sections are ready to go.
  • Include a cover letter to boost your chances of landing a job interview.

And that’s it. You’re ready to start your new job as a certified nursing assistant. And that alone is impressive. Good luck!

Do you have any other questions on how to make a CNA resume? Or maybe you’re already a registered nurse who’d like to share some advice? I’d love to hear from you! Give me a shout-out in the comments below.

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This article has been reviewed by our editorial team to make sure it follows Zety's editorial guidelines. We’re committed to sharing our expertise and giving you trustworthy career advice tailored to your needs. High-quality content is what brings over 40 million readers to our site every year. But we don't stop there. Our team conducts original research to understand the job market better, and we pride ourselves on being quoted by top universities and prime media outlets from around the world.

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Maciej Duszyński, CPRW
Maciej is a career expert and Certified Professional Resume Writer with a solid background in the education management industry. He's worked with people at all stages of their career paths: from interns to directors to C-suite members, he now helps you find your dream job.
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