You control your data

We use cookies to tailor the experience of creating resumes and cover letters. For these reasons, we may share your usage data with third parties. You can find more information about how we use cookies on our Cookies Policy. If you would like to set your cookies preferences, click the Settings button below. To accept all cookies, click Accept.

Settings Accept

Cookie settings

Click on the types of cookies below to learn more about them and customize your experience on our Site. You may freely give, refuse or withdraw your consent. Keep in mind that disabling cookies may affect your experience on the Site. For more information, please visit our Cookies Policy and Privacy Policy.

Choose type of cookies to accept

Analytics

These cookies allow us to analyze our performance to offer you a better experience of creating resumes and cover letters. Analytics related cookies used on our Site are not used by Us for the purpose of identifying who you are or to send you targeted advertising. For example, we may use cookies/tracking technologies for analytics related purposes to determine the number of visitors to our Site, identify how visitors move around the Site and, in particular, which pages they visit. This allows us to improve our Site and our services.

Performance and Personalization

These cookies give you access to a customized experience of our products. Personalization cookies are also used to deliver content, including ads, relevant to your interests on our Site and third-party sites based on how you interact with our advertisements or content as well as track the content you access (including video viewing). We may also collect password information from you when you log in, as well as computer and/or connection information. During some visits, we may use software tools to measure and collect session information, including page response times, download errors, time spent on certain pages and page interaction information.

Advertising

These cookies are placed by third-party companies to deliver targeted content based on relevant topics that are of interest to you. And allow you to better interact with social media platforms such as Facebook.

Necessary

These cookies are essential for the Site's performance and for you to be able to use its features. For example, essential cookies include: cookies dropped to provide the service, maintain your account, provide builder access, payment pages, create IDs for your documents and store your consents.

To see a detailed list of cookies, click here.

Save preferences
My Account
High School Student Resume: Examples, Guide & Template

High School Student Resume: Examples, Guide & Template

You’re done with high schooling, but yet again, you’ve got to hit the books and learn how to write a high school student resume. No worries. You’ll pass with flying colours.

When I was your age…

 

That’s it. That’s the last straw.

 

Maybe your family didn’t need a resume when applying for a job, but you do. And you’ve been well aware of that for quite some time.

 

Once you’re done with this high school student resume guide, you’ll prove it indeed is not a walk-uphill both ways.

 

You’ll make it a full sprint.

 

OK boomer?

 

This guide will show you: 

 

  • A sample resume for high school students better than 9 out of 10 other resumes.
  • How to make a high school student resume with no work experience.
  • Tips and examples of how to put skills and achievements on a resume for high school students.
  • How to describe any experience you have to get the job you want.

 

Here’s a high school resume example made with our builder.

 

Want to save time and have your resume ready in 5 minutes? Try our resume builder. It’s fast and easy to use. Plus, you’ll get ready-made content to add with one click. See 20+ resume templates and create your resume here.

 

Create your resume now

 

high school student resume example
high school student resume example

Sample resume made in our builder—See more resume templates here.

 

High School Student Resume Template

 

Cheryl Austin

250-827-2132

cherylaustin@email.com

 

Objective

 

Outgoing and approachable high school student, passionate about arts and teamwork. Seeking to use exceptional communication skills and creative sensitivity as an Assistant Intern at M-Socials Agency.

 

Education

 

Dawson Creek Secondary School, Dawson Creek, BC

Expected Graduation: 2022

  • GPA: 3.8
  • Shortlisted for the Best Book Illustration award among ca. 150 school student participants.
  • Excelled in Art and English classes.

 

Experience

 

Team Captain

DCSS Basketball Team

May 2018–Present

Key Achievements

  • Added additional 2 hours to our training program for team building activities. Saw a spike in trust at the court, translating into better evaluation scores with every game.
  • Promoted the team wearing our basketball uniform while cleaning up the town during Earth Day. 50% more visitors came for our games.
  • Signed up 24 potential new players during the Open School Days, which is 3 times more than any other captain has before me.

 

Skills

 

  • Teamwork
  • Adaptability
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Effective communication skills
  • Active listening skills
  • Creative thinking skills
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Decision-making skills
  • Leadership skills

 

Awards

 

  • 2nd place award in a National Young Pianists Competition in Vancouver (14–16 age group).

 

Languages

 

  • French—Bilingual fluency

 

Now, here’s the job-winning high school resume formula:

 

1. Format Your High School Student Resume Template

 

To play a game, you need to build a character first. 

 

A well-formatted resume is money in the bank, and you’d instead create a Mortimer than a Bob. Motherlode is useless in a real world.

 

So, let’s learn the code language for high school student resume formatting:

 

High School Student Resume Format

 

  • Create a header for your contact information that stands out from the rest of the resume. Don’t add your photo, date of birth, and any other sensitive information.
  • Pick a font that’s easy on the eyes and scannable. Calibri, Arial, or Verdana are great choices. Make it 10–12 points in the resume font size.
  • Set margins to 1-inch on every side and line-spacing to 1–1.15.
  • Choose the reverse-chronological format for your high school resume. Start each section with the most recent entry.
  • Divide your resume into sections: personal information, objective, education, experience, and skills. Later, you can add miscellaneous parts, such as certifications or extracurricular activities.
  • Put your education above the work history section. It’s the most prominent section of yours due to having little to no work experience. You’ll shift the focus away from the fact that you haven’t got any professional achievements yet.
  • Be consistent with the date format—month and year all the way through.
  • Use bullet points to enter your examples.
  • Stay on one page. Keep it short and simple.

 

Great! You know the basics.

 

Now take a look at the resume header formatting so that recruiters know how to contact you:

 

Full Name

 

Include your first and last name in the header. You can highlight it by changing the font size by 2 points max.

 

Phone Number

 

Add your correct phone/cell number to make sure the recruiter can contact you.

 

Email Address

 

Write your professional email address, e.g., cherylaustin@email.com. So if you have to create a new one because you’re still using your high school handle, do it.

 

Social Media, Blog, or Website

 

Whatever job you’re applying for, check your social presence. Recruiters do look at your profiles to get their first impression of you. Do yourself a favour and update your privacy settings to hide anything potentially controversial or embarrassing.

 

The other thing is to add your social media, blog, or website handles if you’re applying for creative jobs where employers wish to see a portfolio. Recruiters are fond of candidates who walk the extra mile, making their jobs easier. 

 

2. Show How You Excelled at School

 

Although you wish you were in Riverdale to deal with the mystery instead of your teach, you can’t quite run away from it. 

 

And that’s good. 

 

Resumes for high school students take pride in the education section. So to nail it, use it to show you’re an engaged student that knows where your priorities lay and what’s your approach to development.

 

You say boring, I say smart.

 

Check out the below example to see how to write education on your high school resume:

 

Sample Resume For High School Student—Education

RIGHT

Dawson Creek Secondary School, Dawson Creek, BC

Expected Graduation: 2022

  • GPA: 3.8
  • Shortlisted for the Best Book Illustration award among ca. 150 school student participants.
  • Excelled in Art and English classes.

There are quite a few rules to remember when writing the education section for a high school student:

 

  • Write your most recent education at the top. If you changed schools, report the current at the beginning of the section.
  • Mention the full name of the school and its location.
  • Add your graduation date or when you expect to graduate with a diploma.
  • Include a GPA score only if it’s higher than 3.5. You can also boast about your SAT scores.
  • Name any awards, honours, or accolades you received during your high school years.
  • List any relevant coursework if the courses you took are similar to the description of the job you’re applying for.
  • Note extracurricular activities, volunteer work, or study abroad programs.They fit here perfectly, too.

 

Remember that whatever extra you add to your resume must be relevant to the position you wish to get. Or else, you risk losing against the Applicant Tracking Software (ATS). That’s how recruiters don’t get to read your resume.

 

ATS isn’t your enemy, though, as long as you know how to outsmart it. The trick is to use the keywords from the job description and stay relevant at all times. The keywords are words and phrases that describe desired skills, qualifications, and experience.

 

Speaking of, let’s move on to the section you dread most—

 

3. Describe Your Work Experience, Or Any

 

I’ve heard that Matt got an A+ and you missed only one point to get it, too.

 

But hey! Next time, right?

 

Well, sorry to disappoint, but you won’t have the next time at a job. 

 

A Matt would take it.

 

Don’t let anyone do better than you and take what should be yours. Learn ways to write an A++ work experience section even if you’ve never worked anywhere.

 

Have you played in a team? Helped your neighbours regularly? Or maybe you did some volunteering? Each works just as well. 

 

Recruiters looking for juniors don’t want to know where you were employed, but whether you show transferable skills that your future employer can use.

 

Here’s the example that shows just that:

 

High School Student Resume With No Work Experience

RIGHT

Team Captain

DCSS Basketball Team

May 2019–Present

Key Achievements

  • Added additional 2 hours to our training program for team building activities. Saw a spike in trust at the court, translating into better evaluation scores with every game.
  • Promoted the team wearing our basketball uniform while cleaning up the town during Earth Day. 50% more viewers came for our games.
  • Signed up 24 potential new players during the Open School Days, which is 3 times more than any other captain has before me.
WRONG

DCSS Basketball Team

Team Captain

  • Organized team-building activities.
  • Cleaned the town wearing team’s uniforms.
  • Promoted the team during the Open School Days.

Holy moly guacamole!

 

Do you know how to make your experience history such a success? Here’s how:

 

  • Read and reread the job ad. You want to know what to include in your job application, all the keywords that describe desired qualifications and qualities. 
  • Now have a think about all the stuff you learned at school, side gigs, extracurriculars or doing hobbies. Use those details to prove you can translate the skills you have to the skills they need.
  • Write who you acted as, where, and when. Then move on to your key achievements.
  • You heard that right. Write about accomplishments, not responsibilities.
  • And you do that in 3-4 bullet points.
  • Structure your sentences like accomplishment statements. Start each with an action verb in the past tense and quantify your results. You led a team that won the city championships 4 times in a row, or maybe you designed leaflets to increase your club’s attendance by 27%? Excellent. Keep up that vibe.
  • Never lie and—
  • Speak about your achievements only. Teamwork is a skill, not an accomplishment.

Pro Tip: If you have no work experience, don’t name that section “work history or “work experience.” Call it “experience” instead. It does the trick.

When making a resume in our builder, drag & drop bullet points, skills, and auto-fill the boring stuff. Spell check? Check. Start building a professional resume template here for free.

 

When you’re done, Zety’s resume builder will score your resume and tell you exactly how to make it better.

 

But going back to the skills—

 

4. List the Skills You Need for the Job

 

Ever taken part in a talent show?

 

Hopefully.

 

It’s time to perform again. Show your talent, that is.

 

Make a shortlist of your transferable skills that’ll come in handy at work. Employers value employability skills because they give them insight into how you’re going to perform on the job. 

 

To pick the ones you need, use the job ad again. There are skills you need to have in your resume and make friends with the ATS.

 

But, have you heard of hard and soft skills? 

 

Those are the two types of skills you can learn on the job or have a natural aptitude for. The best skills section shows a mix of the two. 

 

Hard skills are particular to each role, e.g., InDesign for graphic designers or car engine structure for a car mechanic. 

 

Soft skills involve personal abilities, e.g., active listening, communication, or problem-solving. 

 

See what high school resume skills you could include in yours:

 

Resume Skills for High School Students

 

  • Collaboration
  • Communication skills
  • Active listening skills
  • Adaptability
  • Attention to detail
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Empathy
  • Critical thinking
  • Decision-making
  • Problem-solving
  • Creative thinking
  • Analytical thinking
  • Computer skills
  • Technical skills
  • Leadership skills
  • Organizational skills
  • Project management skills

 

Work your skills into your experience and education as if you wanted the recruiter to read between the lines.

 

See these two high school student resume examples of Cheryl’s list of skills and then proof of aptitude for leadership in the experience history section:

 

High School Resume Examples—Skills

RIGHT
  • Teamwork
  • Adaptability
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Effective communication skills
  • Active listening skills
  • Creative thinking skills
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Decision-making skills
  • Leadership skills
RIGHT

Key achievements

  • Added additional 2 hours to our training program for team building activities. Saw a spike in trust at the court, translating into better evaluation scores with every game.

Remember that it’s never too late to get better at things. Work on your skills while you’re in high school and let employers enjoy your application.

 

So far, so good. Let’s keep on going, not to lose pace.

 

5. Add Other Sections to Your High School Resume

 

Remember when I spoke about the extras?

 

Fantastic.

 

Now it’s time to add them to your resume. And you have plenty of choices:

 

Resume High School Student—Additional Sections

 

Awards

 

Don’t get shy when it comes to writing your high school resume. It’s your chance to show off and not get called names. Awards are perfect indicators of your approach to the things you’ve been working on. Who wouldn’t love a motivated employee?

 

Volunteering

 

This is one of the easiest ways to convince the hiring managers to yourself. Sometimes it’s not what you do to get better at your job. More often, it’s about becoming a better human. And the best way to do it is through giving someone else a hand, showing you’re ready to help in times of need. That’s also teamwork, isn’t it?

 

Hobbies & Interests

 

You could write you read books or listen to music, but where would that get you? Somewhere but the job-valley. It’s safe to say that only relevant hobbies are worth claiming land on your resume. Relevant, meaning the ones that give your employer insights into your skillset.

 

Certifications

 

Ooh, these look great on a high school student resume. Understandably, you may not have one yet, but you could get some. Udemy, Coursera, HubSpot, and even YouTube, where you spend so much time, offer free courses. Take the opportunity while seeking employment and make your resume so much stronger.

 

Languages

 

Young people learn languages far quicker than adults. Use that to your advantage, especially if you’re about to work in communications. Cultural sensitivity and awareness are Yeezy-new-collection-level desired. And that’s what knowing foreign languages means.

 

Extracurriculars

 

If you’re using your time at school not only for schooling, then mention it. Student president or club member? These are fantastic examples to prove you’re an interesting person and education isn’t a joke to you.

 

Take a look below at an example of additional sections on a resume for high school students:

RIGHT

Awards

 

  • 2nd place award in a National Young Pianists Competition in Vancouver (14–16 age group).

 

Languages

 

  • French—Bilingual fluency

Wowza!

 

The potential is striking. You can see it, and so can recruiters. 

 

The resume objective is another way to show it.

 

6. Be Game in the Resume Objective

 

It’s almost over. 

 

I promise.

 

Before landing here, you may’ve probably heard or read about resume summary or objective. So to recap—

 

A career summary is a gist of your work experience, plus a brief introduction of your skillset. It’s best for candidates with an established career or a couple of years of experience. 

 

On the other side stands a resume objective.

 

A career objective is a 2-3 sentence statement about what you want to bring to the table, together with your transferable and employability skills and why it’s of interest to your employer.

 

As much as I wish it were, it’s not a cooking recipe in which you can guesstimate the contents. Instead, you should go for the must-have ingredients:

 

[Your strong trait(s)][title you’re holding]. Seeking to support/gain/etc. [your offer][company name]. [2-3 skills optionally].

 

You must be wondering, “Why now?” as this section is at the very top of a resume?

 

I just wanted to make it easier for you so that you don’t have to create an objective anew, only reuse the working parts. Now you can pick up all the skills and accomplishments from the education, experience, and skills sections. 

 

See how Cheryl used the objective template in her high school resume:

 

High School Student Resume Objective

RIGHT

Outgoing and approachable high school student, passionate about arts and teamwork. Seeking to use exceptional communication skills and creative sensitivity as an Assistant Intern at M-Socials Agency.

WRONG

Outgoing high school student without social media experience, but a quick learner. Hope to get an internship as an Assistant at M-Socials Agency.

Are you yawning? 

 

I’m sure you are.

 

The second example is so generic that recruiters fall asleep mid-sentence. And there are only two.

 

But you have one more chance to evidence you’re an engaging writer. Or, more importantly, a perfect candidate.

 

7. Attach a Cover Letter

 

You’re big enough to stop believing in tall tales your lazy friends tell you. 

 

So, don’t get mad, but if you thought you needn’t have to write a cover letter, then you were wrong. Unless, of course, you want to lower your chances.

 

Remember Matt? He wrote a cover letter. And got that fancy job in a French café where you like to spend time.

 

Let’s do better. 

 

Let’s write a cover letter to a high school resume that swipes recruiters off their feet and give you a job in a pâtisserie opposite where all the cool kids hang:

 

  • Copy the resume template design and formatting to your cover letter. Leave a lot of whitespace for your content.
  • Add your contact details again, but also address your hiring manager. Find their full name and job title. If that proves impossible, write “Dear Hiring Manager” as the salutation. Everything else is Carnage-bad.
  • Create a compelling outline that introduces you, speaks about your qualities, and reinforces your motivation to join the company.
  • Show your personality. Facts are already in your resume. Don’t repeat yourself.
  • Ask them to schedule a meeting with you and sign off.

 

Alright, alright.

 

You’re good to go.

 

It wasn’t so hard, was it?

 

A great cover letter that matches your resume will give you an advantage over other candidates. You can write it in our cover letter builder here. Here's what it may look like:

 

See more cover letter templates and start writing.

Key Takeaways

 

Here’s how to write a high school resume step by step:

 

  • Format it first. Pick a template you like, create enough room to write on, and have a go right at it.
  • Next, give your educational background the fullest attention. If you do that, recruiters will focus on that instead of your lacking professional accomplishments.
  • Even if you don’t have a work history, tell the recruiter if, from any of your experiences, you gained the skills applicable to the role you’re trying to get.
  • Mix hard and soft skills. Show your qualifications and qualities tailored to the job description.
  • Additional items on a resume for a high school student can get you the job. Awards, certifications, or volunteer work show what personal growth means to you.
  • Write a compelling resume objective that proves you have the skills and willingness to apply them on the job. And that you can bring the results your employer anticipates.
  • Attach a cover letter to your job application. Show you’re not only dry facts but an exciting personality worth knowing.

 

Thanks for reading my guide! Now I’d love to hear from you: 

 

  • What are the biggest challenges of writing a resume for the first job? 
  • Which part do you struggle with the most as a high school student?
  • Would you like to know more? Have I missed anything?

 

Let me know. Let’s get the discussion started!

Rate my article: high school student resume example
Average: 5 (4 votes)
Thank you for voting
Katarzyna Furman
Katarzyna is an empathetic career expert dedicated to encouraging growth in job hunters through building perfect resumes, CVs, and cover letters. At Zety, she gives her Certified Professional Resume Writer advice to make you realize you have a successful track record that only needs to see the daylight.

Similar articles